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    Guest Bloggers

    The Ultimate Computer

    January 14, 2019 1404 Views No comments

    Computers work because information is gathered, transmitted and stored via electrical signals.

    The human brain works because information is gathered, transmitted and stored via electrical signals.

    Computers work because they are directed to do so by special programs referred to as software. Humans create the software for computers. Perhaps in the future computers will be able to create their own software. (artificial intelligence)

    The human brain works (thinks, calculates, remembers, deduces etc.) because it possesses the most complex software (human intelligence) known to mankind. Moreover, the human brain can change and create new software (thoughts, ideas, memories etc.) throughout its life. No current computer is capable of doing that.

    The hardware of a computer consists of a series of wires, electrical micro circuits, chips, processors, screen etc., all of which are made by man. There is no computer on the face of the earth that is capable of repairing or replacing even the simplest part of its own hardware.

    The human brain, on a daily basis, changes its hardware, better known as neural circuits. The basic unit of the human neural circuit is the neuron. Thousands of neurons die on a daily basis and are replaced by new ones. Branches of existing neurons wither while new ones reach out to connect with adjacent neurons. This is our neural network, our hardware, and it changes daily. No computer on the face of the earth can do this.

    There are many things we can do to harm the growth of our neural circuitry. The good news is that there are many things we can do to stimulate the growth of our neural circuits, at any stage of life.

    This involves making better lifestyle choices. What are they?

    David Bardsley

    Shop Smarter Next Year >>

    The Ultimate Choice is Ours

    January 7, 2019 3536 Views No comments

    Being human is tricky, because life can be both magical and messy from one moment to the next. Part of this is ultimately because we never chose this life. It’s not as if one day we decided to be born and, next thing we knew, we were taking our first breath. Nope. That’s not how it worked. But just because we didn’t choose to be born doesn’t mean we don’t get to choose how to live—our ultimate choice.

    We have all heard the saying “life is full of choices.” I can hear the game show Let’s Make a Deal ringing in my ears now: “What’s behind door number 3, Johnny?” The average adult makes over 35,000 choices per day. Over a year, that’s over 12 million choices—over a lifetime, just under 1 billion. Of course, many of these decisions don’t have a profound impact on the direction of our life. I’m not sure if whether I wore black or blue socks one day will determine much about my future. However, many of our choices do directly impact us and, in many cases, we unintentionally chose wrongly.

    The reason I say “unintentionally” is because I believe that we all want to live long and healthy lives. I don’t hear many people say, “I want to be super healthy and die at a young age.” I also believe that we want to be happy and create a meaningful life filled with love, gratitude, kindness, connection, and belonging. This is why I wrote this book. I wanted to create an aid to help people and the world. Because I know what it means to make too many wrong choices. I mastered the art of trying to find the meaningful and the feel-good in all the wrong places. And my hope is to help people avoid the mistakes I made by offering the same roadmap that turned my life around and inspired me to finally live a life that matters.

    I hope you choose to not only buy and read this book, but to actually do it. I promise it will be a choice you won’t regret.

    You matter.
    Matthew Emerzian

    Shop Every Monday Matters >>

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    Guest Blogger: Lisa Hammond

    July 27, 2011 2850 Views

    Here's a post from Lisa Hammond, author of Oh Thank Goodness, It's Not Just Me!

    I have a quote hanging up that says, "At worst a house unkept cannot be so distressing as a life unlived." Rose Macaulay already had that figured out back in 1881. She was way ahead of her time!

    Summer seems like the perfect time to follow Rose's lead and really start living your life. When was the last time you went off to play hooky? If you can't remember, I suggest you carve out some playtime for yourself immediately. The work can wait, skip the meeting, let the laundry pile up, and take a break.

    I have a friend who used to say he wouldn't take a day off because he was sure the company couldn't function without him. He told everyone he was the guy holding up the sun. Well, it turns out, after he retired the sun still managed to come up every single day without him.

    I think a lot of us are convinced we are the ones "holding up the sun." News flash, we aren't. The sun is okay without our help.

    The world—yes even your own company—will get along just fine without you for a few days, even weeks. In fact, I truly believe it will even benefit from your absence if you take some time off to recharge your batteries. As Larry Eisenberg said, "For peace of mind, resign as general manager of the universe."

    Women especially seem to have forgotten the being part of human being. We somehow bought into the human doing theory. It is easy to forget that we are multidimensional women, and we need to nurture all aspects of our lives. And that includes pleasure.

    You are the only one who can schedule down time for yourself. Make it a priority and enjoy the blissful summer sunshine—because it turns out you aren't the one holding it up!

    Lisa Hammond

    The Barefoot CEO ®

    Guest Post: An Old Role Model

    June 21, 2011 2509 Views

    Terry Crenshaw, guest bloggerToday, I'd like to share a submission from one of our readers, Terry Crenshaw! Please enjoy her motivating blog post:

    As far as the economy goes, we're going through some rough times; that's not a big secret, and while it's not particularly pleasant to think about, there's hardly any sense in denying it - especially because with the current set of challenges there are also ample opportunities. I've been overhearing a lot of young people recently - soon-to-be college graduates, in particular - discussing the relative dearth of jobs on the market right now. I empathize with them, and I also see a lot of value in youthful vigor and exuberance. That said, I can't help but think that this is one area in which we can learn a thing or two from older generations.

    Let me create a contrast with the young people I just mentioned. I know an older man who recently retired from a job he had held down for many years - and less than a week into his retirement, he had already launched a brand new business enterprise! This is an almost comical exaggeration of an entrepreneurial spirit that can't be bottled up or held down, but it serves to illustrate a larger point. Simply put, there is something to be said for courage - for having the audacity to take initiative even when it isn't what's necessary, what's expected, or what conventional wisdom dictates is right.

    This is the kind of spirit that I think would behoove many of our young people. Feeling inhibited by a less-than-favorable economy is completely understandable, but my challenge would be to consider surveying the current economic landscape from a new perspective. So there isn't as much work to be found from other companies as you might like - isn't that an invitation to do something creative, courageous, and totally outside of the box? Isn't that a golden opportunity to go into business for yourself?

    Looking at it as an opportunity is something I feel members of the older generation would smile on. I know that men of my grandfather's generation, or even my father's generation, would never believe there could be a time with no success to be found, no money to be made, so long as there's some hard work involved.

    And lest you think I'm espousing a kind of blindly romantic version of the old elbow-grease, pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps creed, let me hasten to note that many entrepreneurs have chosen to view the current economic roughness as a blessing rather than a curse, and the results have often been quite impressive. Consider the fact that big businesses and large corporations are less able to provide their services than they may have been in the past. This creates an opening for the little guys.

    As such, more and more go-getters with an inventive spirit have taken to starting their own small boutique companies - businesses that can provide what larger corporations now leave untouched. The great irony is that many of these boutique companies are actually providing their services directly to these larger companies. Big businesses are finding that it's less costly to outsource than to maintain full-time staffers, which is a real boon for these newer start-ups.

    It's also proof of the wisdom of the older generation: There really is something to be said for courageous thinking in times likes these, not just on a philosophical level but in practice as well. Are you allowing the fear of failure - the often paralyzing implications of a challenging economy - to box in your good ideas? Or are you interpreting those challenges as opportunities, and allowing your creativity and courage to truly flourish? The answer is more important than you might think - and it could spell the difference between failure and success.

    Terry Crenshaw covers economic trends in the United States and writes for www.peterorszagsite.com. Terry is especially interested in tracking the ideas of Peter Orszag and other economic experts as the economy attempts to recover from the recent recession.

    Get motivated today with our top titles.

    Sharing the Pangs of Working Mother Guilt

    May 8, 2011 2063 Views

    Today, I'm happy to share a special post from BJ Gallagher, author of Oh Thank Goodness, It's Not Just Me!, Oil for Your Lamp, and other Simple Truths books. I hope this inspires you this Mother's Day:

    BJGallagherWhen I first started working full-time, my son Michael was 11. I had spent the previous seven years in college, earning my BA and then pursing a PhD, while single-handedly raising my son. Shifting from full-time student to a full-time job was a big change. I was accustomed to spending lots of time at home studying and writing, with only about 25% of my time in classes. And Michael was accustomed to coming home from school to his mom and a snack.

    Now suddenly, I was gone all day every day, and Michael became a latchkey kid. It was hard on both of us.

    One day I complained to my boss Karen: "I feel torn. When I'm doing a great job at work, my kid gets lonely and starts acting out. Then I start spending more time with him and I feel like my work suffers. No matter which way I move, it seems I'm not doing justice to one or the other - my family or my work."

    "Join the club," Karen replied. "Welcome to the world of working mothers. I can guarantee you - all working moms feel the same push/pull that you're experiencing ... and I'll be some fathers do, too."

    "What do you do about it?" I asked her, hoping for a magic bullet to solve my problem.

    "Deal with it," she replied. "There is no easy answer. Just learn to live in the tension between work and family ... do the best you can."

    I shared that story with Lisa Hammond recently, as we were comparing notes on being working mothers. Lisa had founded her own catalog company almost 20 years ago while she still had young kids at home. She understood exactly what I was talking about - feeling torn between career and family. Attempting to console me, she shared her own story:

    "I always wanted to be the best mom in the world but I've rarely been able to live up to that standard.," Lisa said. "I stayed at home when my kids were little and didn't start my business until they were both in school. When my daughter Harlie was in fifth grade and my son Bridger in kindergarten, I gave birth to my new business. I had so much going on - kids, husband, home, and now, a start-up. What I didn't have was sleep!

    "I recall it was late October and I was scrambling to get ready for my first serious holiday season at work. Bridger's teacher had scheduled a Halloween party for his class. Since I am not Martha Stewart, rather than sew Bridger's Halloween costume, I ordered it from a catalog. On the day of the party I got Bridger all dressed up in his green tights, green shoes, bright orange round pumpkin and matching stem hat. He looked adorable. We raced out the door and I dropped him off at school on my way to the office.

    "I had only been at work for about five minutes when I received a phone call - it was the school. Bridger was on the phone in tears. 'Mom, you had the wrong day!' he sobbed. 'The Halloween party is tomorrow!' He was the only child at school in a costume. He had been hiding in the bathroom when his teacher found him. Now I was in tears, too.

    "I made the 'drive of shame' home to get Bridger's school uniform and then back to the school so he could change. I'll never forget this angry little boy with a tear-stained face - dressed like a pumpkin - waiting for me. The look on his face still haunts me and I cringe when I think about it - a 'bad mother' day, for sure!"

    Lisa and I shared a good laugh. And the wise words of British author C.S. Lewis came to mind: "Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another, 'What! You, too? I thought I was the only one.'"

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