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Guest Blogger: Lisa Hammond

July 27, 2011 33 Views

Here's a post from Lisa Hammond, author of Oh Thank Goodness, It's Not Just Me!

I have a quote hanging up that says, “At worst a house unkept cannot be so distressing as a life unlived.” Rose Macaulay already had that figured out back in 1881. She was way ahead of her time!

Summer seems like the perfect time to follow Rose's lead and really start living your life. When was the last time you went off to play hooky? If you can’t remember, I suggest you carve out some playtime for yourself immediately. The work can wait, skip the meeting, let the laundry pile up, and take a break.

I have a friend who used to say he wouldn't take a day off because he was sure the company couldn't function without him. He told everyone he was the guy holding up the sun. Well, it turns out, after he retired the sun still managed to come up every single day without him.

I think a lot of us are convinced we are the ones "holding up the sun." News flash, we aren't. The sun is okay without our help.

The world—yes even your own company—will get along just fine without you for a few days, even weeks. In fact, I truly believe it will even benefit from your absence if you take some time off to recharge your batteries. As Larry Eisenberg said, “For peace of mind, resign as general manager of the universe.”

Women especially seem to have forgotten the being part of human being. We somehow bought into the human doing theory. It is easy to forget that we are multidimensional women, and we need to nurture all aspects of our lives. And that includes pleasure.

You are the only one who can schedule down time for yourself. Make it a priority and enjoy the blissful summer sunshine—because it turns out you aren’t the one holding it up!

Lisa Hammond

The Barefoot CEO ®

New Release: Leadership Quotes

July 12, 2011 32 Views

I love quotes! Always have...always will.

In fact, my love of quotes inspired me to publish my very first book, a small, 80-page quotation book that I called Motivational Quotes. I'm pleased to say it sold 800,000 copies.

That book covers quotations on a wide variety of topics, but as a lifetime entrepreneur, I've always been fascinated by the topic of leadership. What traits, or qualities, do most great leaders possess?

Thus, the inspiration for our new book, Leadership Quotes. My goal was to find the very best quotes on the most important traits of leadership...like vision, passion, serving, integrity and commitment to excellence...to name a few.

Therefore, if you're a leader, or aspire to be a leader, it is my hope that Leadership Quotes will inspire you....to inspire others.

Here's a little sampling to get you started:

"Management is doing things right. Leadership is doing the right things."
-Peter Drucker

"None of us is as smart as all of us."
-Ken Blanchard

"The supreme quality for a leader is unquestionably integrity."
-Dwight D. Eisenhower

"Good leaders must become what they want their followers to become."
-Nido R. Qubein

"If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader."
-John Quincy Adams

"A gifted leader is one who is capable of touching your heart."
-Jacob Samuel Potofsky

"If you work just for money, you'll never make it, but if you love what you're doing and you always put the customer first, success will be yours."
-Ray Kroc

"A leader has the vision and conviction that a dream can be achieved. He inspires the power and energy to get it done."
-Ralph Nader

"Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them."
-John C. Maxwell

"You will never become a fine leader until you become a fine servant."
-Ellie Lofaro

Check out Leadership Quotes for more motivation! What quotes about leadership have inspired you?

We all have a little voice inside us...

July 5, 2011 16 Views

"I think we all have a little voice inside us that will guide us...if we shut out all the noise and clutter from our lives and listen to that voice, it will tell us the right thing to do.

Christopher Reeve said these words, and his quote captures the essence of what our motivational book Walk the Talk is all about.

It reminds us that having values is important, but living them is much more important...that words without deeds are nothing!

QUESTION: What does "courage" have to do with being a person of good character...with someone who stays true to their principles and their values?

ANSWER: EVERYTHING!

You see, being values-driven means two things:

Doing what's right - following our conscience; refusing to compromise our principles, despite pressures and temptations to the contrary, and

Taking a stand against what's wrong - speaking out, whenever we see others do things that are incorrect or inappropriate.

Unquestionably, both of those require guts and fortitude...they require courage.

Courage is...

Following your conscience instead of "following the crowd".
Refusing to take part in hurtful or disrespectful behaviors.
Sacrificing personal gain for the benefit of others.
Speaking your mind even though others don't agree.
Taking complete responsibility for your actions...and your mistakes.
Following the rules - and insisting that others do the same.
Challenging the status quo in search of better ways.
Doing what you know is right- regardless of the risks and potential consequences.

I'd like to share the "Cadet Prayer" that is repeated during chapel services at the U.S. Military Academy:

"Make us to choose the harder right instead of the easier wrong, and never to be content with a half truth when the whole truth can be won. Endow us with the courage that is born of loyalty to all that is noble and worthy, that scorns to compromise with vice and injustice and knows no fear when truth and right are in jeopardy."

That is truly the essence of courage.

Have you read our motivational gift book Walk the Talk? How do you walk your talk?

Inspiring change using the 100/0 Principle

June 22, 2011 53 Views

Brian Tracy said..."Eighty percent of life's satisfaction comes from meaningful relationships." Think about it...when you look back at the end of your life what will really matter? Five words...the quality of your relationships.

So here's the question: If your relationships are the most important part of your life, what are you doing to make them all they can be?

The 100/0 Principle may be the most important book you'll ever read.

For me, it ranks in the top 3...ever! The message is truly life-changing.

You've probably heard me say, it's not what you say, but how you say it, that turns the switch from "off" to "on." In fact, our book,212°...The Extra Degree, is a great example of that, but...The 100/0 Principle is even better. The examples, the stories, the quotes provoke many "a-ha" moments. Simply put, this is a book that can make your marriage better and greatly improve your relationships with family members, friends, co-workers and...even your boss.

Here's a brief excerpt from The 100/0 Principle. Enjoy!

What is the most effective way to create and sustain great relationships with others? It's The 100/0 Principle: You take full responsibility (the 100) for the relationship, expecting nothing (the 0) in return.

Implementing The 100/0 Principle is not natural for most of us. It takes real commitment to the relationship and a good dose of self-discipline to think, act and give 100 percent.

The 100/0 Principle applies to those people in your life where the relationships are too important to react automatically or judgmentally. Each of us must determine the relationships to which this principle should apply. For most of us, it applies to work associates, customers, suppliers, family and friends.

  • STEP 1 - Determine what you can do to make the relationship work...then do it. Demonstrate respect and kindness to the other person, whether he/she deserves it or not.
  • STEP 2 - Do not expect anything in return. Zero, zip, nada.
  • STEP 3 - Do not allow anything the other person says or does (no matter how annoying!) to affect you. In other words, don't take the bait.
  • STEP 4 - Be persistent with your graciousness and kindness. Often we give up too soon, especially when others don't respond in kind. Remember to expect nothing in return.

At times (usually few), the relationship can remain challenging, even toxic, despite your 100 percent commitment and self-discipline. When this occurs, you need to avoid being the "Knower" and shift to being the "Learner." Avoid Knower statements/ thoughts like "that won't work," "I'm right, you are wrong," "I know it and you don't," "I'll teach you," "that's just the way it is," "I need to tell you what I know," etc.

Instead use Learner statements/thoughts like "Let me find out what is going on and try to understand the situation," "I could be wrong," "I wonder if there is anything of value here," "I wonder if..." etc. In other words, as a Learner, be curious!

Principle Paradox


This may strike you as strange, but here's the paradox: When you take authentic responsibility for a relationship, more often than not the other person quickly chooses to take responsibility as well. Consequently, the 100/0 relationship quickly transforms into something approaching 100/100. When that occurs, true breakthroughs happen for the individuals involved, their teams, their organizations and their families.

Guest Post: An Old Role Model

June 21, 2011 26 Views

Terry Crenshaw, guest bloggerToday, I'd like to share a submission from one of our readers, Terry Crenshaw! Please enjoy her motivating blog post:

As far as the economy goes, we're going through some rough times; that's not a big secret, and while it's not particularly pleasant to think about, there's hardly any sense in denying it - especially because with the current set of challenges there are also ample opportunities. I've been overhearing a lot of young people recently - soon-to-be college graduates, in particular - discussing the relative dearth of jobs on the market right now. I empathize with them, and I also see a lot of value in youthful vigor and exuberance. That said, I can't help but think that this is one area in which we can learn a thing or two from older generations.

Let me create a contrast with the young people I just mentioned. I know an older man who recently retired from a job he had held down for many years - and less than a week into his retirement, he had already launched a brand new business enterprise! This is an almost comical exaggeration of an entrepreneurial spirit that can't be bottled up or held down, but it serves to illustrate a larger point. Simply put, there is something to be said for courage - for having the audacity to take initiative even when it isn't what's necessary, what's expected, or what conventional wisdom dictates is right.

This is the kind of spirit that I think would behoove many of our young people. Feeling inhibited by a less-than-favorable economy is completely understandable, but my challenge would be to consider surveying the current economic landscape from a new perspective. So there isn't as much work to be found from other companies as you might like - isn't that an invitation to do something creative, courageous, and totally outside of the box? Isn't that a golden opportunity to go into business for yourself?

Looking at it as an opportunity is something I feel members of the older generation would smile on. I know that men of my grandfather's generation, or even my father's generation, would never believe there could be a time with no success to be found, no money to be made, so long as there's some hard work involved.

And lest you think I'm espousing a kind of blindly romantic version of the old elbow-grease, pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps creed, let me hasten to note that many entrepreneurs have chosen to view the current economic roughness as a blessing rather than a curse, and the results have often been quite impressive. Consider the fact that big businesses and large corporations are less able to provide their services than they may have been in the past. This creates an opening for the little guys.

As such, more and more go-getters with an inventive spirit have taken to starting their own small boutique companies - businesses that can provide what larger corporations now leave untouched. The great irony is that many of these boutique companies are actually providing their services directly to these larger companies. Big businesses are finding that it's less costly to outsource than to maintain full-time staffers, which is a real boon for these newer start-ups.

It's also proof of the wisdom of the older generation: There really is something to be said for courageous thinking in times likes these, not just on a philosophical level but in practice as well. Are you allowing the fear of failure - the often paralyzing implications of a challenging economy - to box in your good ideas? Or are you interpreting those challenges as opportunities, and allowing your creativity and courage to truly flourish? The answer is more important than you might think - and it could spell the difference between failure and success.

Terry Crenshaw covers economic trends in the United States and writes for www.peterorszagsite.com. Terry is especially interested in tracking the ideas of Peter Orszag and other economic experts as the economy attempts to recover from the recent recession.

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